Daniel Gawthrop Omar Khadr: Window on the Canadian Soul by Daniel Gawthrop

You can tell a lot about Canadians from how we talk about Omar Khadr. Right now, there’s a lot being said about Khadr that isn’t exactly flattering to those who are saying it. Omar Khadr. It has been been two years since the former child soldier, accused terrorist and... [Read more...]

Brian Fawcett Cultural Appropriation, Misappropriation and Cultural Exchange: A primer by Brian Fawcett

The polarizing issue of whether or not writers can borrow, steal or otherwise employ materials from cultures that aren’t the one they were born within has re-emerged in the midst of Canada’s cultural community. The issue has been around since the 1980s, but this time the... [Read more...]

Brian Fawcett Report from the Writers’ Union, or, Why Should Not Old Men and Women Be Mad? by Brian Fawcett

The Writers’ Union of Canada held its 2017 Annual General Meeting at Vancouver’s Simon Fraser University’s downtown campus June 1-4, and Brian Brett, one of its past chair-thingies, talked me into going. I agreed to go because the Union seemed to be in a state of over governance,... [Read more...]

Newest Articles

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Thinking through the controversy over a child soldier.

Cultural Appropriation, Misappropriation and Cultural Exchange: A primer

Brian Fawcett takes on the current hot-button issue of Cultural Appropriation and what it means to Canada, its artistic community, and to the future of democracy.

Report from the Writers’ Union, or, Why Should Not Old Men and Women Be Mad?

Brian Fawcett attends the AGM of the Writers’ Union of Canada, encounters several revolutions in the making, along with a Manifesto written by writers who are clinically insane or pathologically angry. He passes on the revolutions and joins the angry and/or the crazy writers.

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Letter from Europe: The Little Dutch Boy

He stuck his finger in the leaky dike. Did it stop the floodwaters of right-wing populism washing over Europe?

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Newest Reviews

An Unslick Reckoning

Brian Fawcett reviews B.C. poet Ken Belford’s latest book. He likes Belford, but isn’t so sure about the new work.

Larry Fagin and Prose Poems

Larry Fagin (1937-2017) thought that a lot of life was “off-the-cuff” and that “prose poems” were one way of conveying that insight.

Desperately Seeking Readers

Reading is in big trouble, says critic Alex Good. CanLit, he adds, may be in even bigger trouble.

Caitlin DeSilvey’s Proposition

As a “cultural geographer” wanders through abandoned industrial buildings in “Curated Decay,” Brian Fawcett wonders whether “autoethnography” is just another fancy academic term for preferring self-therapy to dealing with the mess in Detroit and the rest of a dying planet.

Brawl on the Beach: The Making of an Absurdist Masterpiece

How Albert Camus’s literary classic came into being, despite an absurd world and an absent divinity.

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Newest Dictionary Entry

Democracy, Two Cheers for…

[Courtesy of CBC:]

NDP Leader John Horgan to be next premier of British Columbia

Lt.-Gov. Judith Guichon asked Horgan to form a government after Christy Clark lost a confidence vote

By Justin McElroy, CBC News Posted: Jun 29, 2017 8:17 PM PT Last Updated: Jun 29, 2017 10:19 PM PT

NDP Leader John Horgan will become premier of British Columbia and have the opportunity to test the confidence of the House.

John Horgan.

Horgan made the announcement to reporters at Government House on Thursday evening, following a dramatic series of events sparked by a vote of non-confidence in the B.C. Liberal government hours earlier.

“I look forward to working harder than I’ve ever worked before to make sure this great province continues to grow, and that the prosperity that we all want to see for ourselves, we can make sure we can share that prosperity with others,” said Horgan to a group of reporters and supporters who had gathered at the residence of B.C. Lt.-Gov. Judith Guichon

​He said he wanted to put a cabinet and government structure in place as quickly as possible “so we can get moving on the issues that matter to people.”

In a statement, Guichon said she had met with Premier Christy Clark and accepted her resignation.

“I have asked Mr. Horgan to form a government, he having assured me that he can form a government which will have the confidence of the Legislative Assembly.”

Horgan, who will become the 36th Premier of B.C., will be sworn in at a time yet to be determined, though it is expected to happen quickly.

Clark spoke with Guichon for 90 minutes

It means the end of the tenure for the B.C. Liberal leader, who has been premier of B.C. since 2011, and the end of 16 years of B.C. Liberal rule.

Clark met with Guichon for about 90 minutes immediately after her government lost the confidence vote by a 44-42 margin, but left without a decision from Guichon, and without revealing to reporters what had been said.

“I did ask the Lt.-Gov. for dissolution of the house,” said Clark later, after Guichon issued her statement and Horgan made his speech.

“She didn’t grant that request. She chose another path.”

About 15 minutes after Clark left Government House, Horgan arrived at Government House.

Twenty minutes after that, Horgan announced he would be the next premier.

NDP minority, with Green support

“It’s been a long day and it has been a long time coming,” said Green Party Leader Andrew Weaver following the announcement.

“I’m convinced that it is in the interests of the B.C. NDP and our interests to make sure that this works”

The NDP and Green Party have 44 MLAs — the minimum number for a majority — and they all voted in favour of the non-confidence motion and pledged to support Horgan as premier.

Clark had argued in recent days the legislature was “not a functional place” in its current configuration. She said an NDP government would be paralyzed because of the expected need for one of its own MLAs to serve as Speaker, thus creating continued 43-43 vote ties.

It was an argument Guichon ultimately decided to reject.

Guichon will not be making any further comment on her decision beyond her statement.

The provincial election on May 9 ended with the Liberals electing 43 MLAs, the NDP 41 and the Greens three, setting up the last seven weeks of political battles.

All of which came to an end Thursday night, a smiling Horgan departing Government House, flocked by supporters, and ready to become leader of British Columbia.

“It’s been 16 years since there’s been a transition in government,” said Horgan.

“We have much work to do. We’ll have access to government documents tomorrow … we want to swear in a government in the next few days, and get back to work.”

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5:29 AM – 30 Jun 2017

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